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Thylacine literature: 1860-1869

 

Anonymous (1860)

Anonymous. (1860). Palæontology of Australia. The Argus, Tuesday, 21 August, p. 7.

Anonymous. (1860). Palæontology of Australia. Empire, Thursday, 30 August, p. 3.

Anonymous. (1860). Palæontology. The Sydney Morning Herald, Tuesday, 4 September, p. 3.

Anonymous. (1860). Palæontology. The Perth Gazette and Independent Journal of Politics and News (WA), Friday, 7 September, p. 3.

 

Anonymous (1861)

Anonymous. (1861). The international exhibition. The Mercury, Saturday, 21 September, p. 3.

 

Anonymous (1861)

Anonymous. (1861). Tasmania in the International Exhibition. The Mercury, Tuesday, 3 December, p. 2-3.

 

Baudement (1861)

Baudement, G. (1861). Thylacine, pp. 567. In: D'Orbigny, M. C. (ed.). Dictionnaire Universel D'Histoire Naturelle, Vol. 12. Paris: [publisher?].

 

Milligan (1861)

Text:

Of the marsupial mammals the Thylacinus cynocephalus (Tiger or Нуæna of the colonists), and the Dasyurus ursinus (or Devil of the colonists), are peculiar to Tasmania, and both are destructive to flocks, the former to the adult sheep, and the latter to lambs ; but as they only inhabit the wildest and less accessible portions of the country, they are not troublesome or injurious to flocks generally over the island. Specimens of these two animals may be seen at the Zoological Gardens, in Regent's-park. (p. 388)

 

Publication:

Milligan, Joseph. (1861). On Tasmania, its character, products, and resources. Journal of the Society for Arts 9(438): 377-390. [p. 388] https://www.jstor.org/stable/41334350

 

Angas (1862)

Angas, G. F. (1862). Narrative of Australia: a popular account. London: Society for Promotion of Christian Knowledge.

 

Anonymous (1862)

Text:

[The Tasmanian devil] is a marsupial, and among the twelve other different classes of mammals which are specially peculiar to Tasmania, is only to be outdone in rarity by the Thylacinus cynocephalus, or hyena of the colony.

 

Publication:

Anonymous. (1862). The Tasmanian "devil". The Argus, Monday, 20 October, p. 5.

Anonymous. (1862). The Tasmanian "devil". The Star, Wednesday, 22 October, p. 4.

 

Anonymous (1862)

Anonymous. (1863). Australian Extracts. Otago Daily Times, 12 January, issue 331. [reprinted from an 1862 article not available online]

 

Lloyd (1862)

Lloyd, George Thomas. (1862). Thirty-three years in Tasmania and Victoria, being the actual experience of the author interspersed with historic jottings, narratives and counsel to emigrants. London: Houlston and Wright. [p. 76]

 

Smith (1862)

Text:

TASMANIAN TIGERS.

It was emerging on to a small plain which is situate about a mile north from the east end of the Black Bluff Mountain, when I saw the bushes in motion a short distance in front of me. I thought the movement was caused by a number of the wombat tribe, the flesh of which is considered to be good eating by travellers in the bush, to whom meat is a luxury, and I sent forward my young though nearly full-grown dog - a setter spaniel - thinking that he might chase the supposed wombat into a hollow tree, where it could be easily captured. But just at the moment two tigers emerged into the open space, and one of them made off, while the other turned fiercely upon the dog, which running back regarded me with an expression which semed to ask as clearly as instinct could, whether he was to attack in earnest. Again I sent him forward, and this time he advanced with such s display of deter- mination, that the tiger, after a faint show of resistance, began to retreat, when the dog, seizing it by the tail, suffered himself to be led along at a quickish pace, while I followed with the view of overtaking them, till I stumbled and fell, and narrowly escaped being cut by a tomnhawk which I held in my hand. Here the dog rushed back as if to see what was the matter; but I again sent him for- ward, and the tiger, now finding escape im- possible, turned upon its assailant, and both fought with the utmost ferocity for about two minutes, when the dog seizing the tiger by the throat and keeping his hold overpowered it in a few seconds, and I then knocked it on the head, thinking I was doing right in destroying one of a kind of ani- mal which is often very destructive to sheep and lambs. The tiger was sixteen inches high and two feet six inches long from the nose to the tail which, was fourteen inches in length.

A short time after the incident above- mentioned I was on the north side of the River Lea, and seeing my dog suddenly bound off I looked in the direction he had taken, and saw him approaching the largest tiger I had ever seen, and which seemed disposed to treat him with the utmost defiance, rushing at and driving him off whenever he approached within a few feet, and then steadily resuming its course. Thinking, from the size of the tiger, that it might prove dangerous even to a man, should it meet one when without a weapon wherewith to defend himself; and thinking that if it effectually intimidated the dog it might return in the night with its mate -for they often go in pairs- and cause me some annoyance, I resolved upon attempting its destruction, and I ran forward for this pur- pose, tomahawk in hand; but the moment it saw me advancing it reversed its course, and made for a scrub at the margin of the river; but the dog being encouraged by my voice and presence rushed at and fastened upon it repeatedly, but was as often repulsed with a sharp bite; he, however, so retarded its pro- gress that I was enabled to overtake it when, thinking to despatch it at a single blow, I struck it on the head with my tomahawk and fractured its skull ; but, notwithstanding this, it reeling and staggering, fought the dog for fully two minutes, inflicting bite after bite in his neck in rapid succession; and placing its fore feet against the upper part of his breast pushed him off by main strength whenever he fastened upon its throat. While this was going on I could not strike a second blow for fear of wounding the dog, at such a rate did they roll about; at length, however, seeing that the tiger was becoming weak, I seized it by the hind legs, and, placing my foot on the dog to keep him steady, I struck it again with my tomahawk severing the spine of its neck and causing its instant death. The height of this tiger to the lowest part of the top of the back was twenty-one inches; the length of the head and body, three feet four inches; of the tail, seventeen inches. It was a female and had in its false belly four young ones, each adhering firmly to a teat and well covered with hair, and just able to walk. I would have kept these young tigers as specimens of animated nature if I had not found that they would not live on the rough food which alone I had to give them. From what I know of the Tasmanian tiger, I believe that whenever it finds itself' menaced by superior force it retreats for its den, and if it succeeds in this it faces about, and being secure from attack except in front, it defends itself with the utmost ferocity, inflicting severe wounds on any assailant that ventures to close with it. I have only heard of one contest between a sheep dog and a large tiger, and in that the former prevailed, though not without being fearfully lacerated by the teeth of the tiger. With a kangaroo dog I do not think that any tiger would be able to contend long owing chiefly to the superior mode of fighting of the former. I have never known a tiger to attack a man -although I once knew one to walk up to two in the bush, but in this case the intruder was knocked on the head before he had shown any aggressive intentions. I have also known a tiger to follow a man for a considerable distance at night, though not attempting to molest him.

J. S. Forth.

 

Publication:

Smith, James. (1862). Tasmanian tigers. Launceston Examiner, Saturday 22 November, p. 2. [pseudonym J. S. Forth used]

 

Anonymous (1863)

Anonymous. (1863). A native tiger. Empire (Sydney), Friday, 2 January, p. 3.

 

Anonymous (1863)

Anonymous. (1863). Victorian acclimatisation society. The Star, Thursday, 26 November, p. 2 |5|. [Dr. Ferdinand von Mueller sending a thylacine ("pouched wolf") to the Jardin des Plantes, Paris, France]

 

Blyth (1863)

Blyth, Edward. (1863). Catalogue of the Mammalia in the Museum Asiatic Society. Calcutta: Savielle & Cranenburgh. [p. 180]

 

Gould (1863)

Gould, John. (1863). The Mammals of Australia. Volume 1. London: Self published; printed by Taylor and Francis.

 

Gunn (1863)

Gunn, Ronald Campbell. (1863). Letter announcing the shipment of living Thylacines, with remarks on their habits. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 31: 103-104.

 

Anonymous (1864)

Anonymous. (1864). Royal society. The Mercury, Monday, 21 March, p. 2.

 

Anonymous (1864)

Anonymous. (1864). The mammals of Australia. Empire (Sydney), Thursday, 17 March, p. 2.

Anonymous. (1864). The mammals of Australia. The Mercury, Wednesday, 27 April, p. 3. [earliest usage of 'native wolf' I am aware of]

 

Anonymous (1864)

Anonymous. (1864). Town talk and table chat. The Cornwall Chronicle, Saturday, 10 September, p. 5. [Woolnorth tigermen; Lawrence Quinn; brought 10 thylacine skins in]

Anonymous. (1864). Tiger Hunting in Tasmania. The Age (Melbourne), Friday, 16 September, p. 6.

Anonymous. (1864). [Untitled]. The Herald (Melbourne), Friday, 16 September, p. 3.

Anonymous. (1864). [Untitled]. The Argus, Friday, 16 September, p. 5.

Anonymous. (1864). Tiger Hunting in Tasmania. Leader (Melbourne), Saturday, 17 September, p. 5.

Anonymous. (1864). Tasmanian Tigers. The Star (Ballarat), Monday, 19 September, p. 1.

Anonymous. (1864). ["Tiger hunting"]. Gippsland Times, Tuesday, 20 September, p. 3.

Anonymous. (1864). Tiger Hunting in Tasmania. The Sydney Morning Herald, Wednesday, 21 September, p. 13.

Anonymous. (1864). ["Tiger-Hunting"]. Avoca Mail, Saturday, 24 September, p. 2. [Woolnorth tigermen; Lawrence Quinn; brought 10 thylacine skins in]

Anonymous. (1864). Tiger Hunting in Tasmania. Sydney Mail, Saturday, 24 September, p. 3.

Anonymous. (1864). [Untitled]. The Armidale Express and New England General Advertiser, Saturday, 1 October, p. 4.

Anonymous. (1864). Tiger Hunting in Tasmania. Rockhampton Bulletin and Central Queensland Advertiser, Tuesday, 4 October, p. 2.

 

Anonymous (1864)

Anonymous. (1864). ["A very lively native female hyena..."].  The Cornwall Chronicle, Saturday, 26 November, p. 3. [Hampshire Hills; female with three young captured alive; bit her captor; Mr. Wiseman, Emu Bay; sent to Ronald Campbell Gunn, via cutter "Secret"]

 

Anonymous (1864)

Anonymous. (1864). Notes on the fauna of Victoria, with the Australian alliances. The Australasian, Saturday, 3 December, p. 9.

 

Anonymous (1864)

Anonymous. (1864). General News. Launceston Examiner, Thursday, 22 December, p. 3. [Hampshire Hills; female and two young exhibited in Launceston; same mother as Cornwall Chronicle, 26 November?]

 

Anonymous (1864)

Anonymous. (1864). Proceedings of the Royal Society for March, 1864. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1864: 17-19.

 

Anonymous (1864)

Anonymous. (1864). Proceedings of the Royal Society for July, 1864. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1864: 60-61 .

 

Anonymous (1865)

Anonymous. (1865). List of donations to the Australian Museum during March, 1865. The Sydney Morning Herald, Monday, 10 April, p. 5.

 

Anonymous (1865)

Anonymous. (1865). A Glance At Tasmania. Mount Alexander Mail, Wednesday, 19 April, p. 3. [museum specimen]

Anonymous. (1865). A Glance At Tasmania. Launceston Examiner, Tuesday, 2 May, p. 2. [museum specimen]

 

Anonymous (1865)

Anonymous. (1865). Tasmania. The Sydney Morning Herald, Wednesday, 12 July, p. 8.

Anonymous. (1865). Tasmania. Sydney Mail, Saturday, 15 July, p. 11.

 

Anonymous (1865)

Anonymous. (1865). List of donations to the Australian Museum during September, 1865. The Sydney Morning Herald, Tuesday, 10 October, p. 4.

Anonymous. (1865). List of donations to the Australian Museum during September, 1865. Empire (Sydney), Tuesday, 10 October, p. 5.

Anonymous. (1865). List of donations to the Australian Museum during September, 1865. Sydney Mail, Saturday, 14 October, p. 6.

 

Anonymous (1865)

Anonymous. (1865). Proceedings of the Royal Society for October, 1865. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1865: 105-108 .

 

Flower (1865)

Flower, W. H. (1865). On the commissures of the cerebral hemispheres of the Marsupialia and Monotremata as compared with those of Placental Mammals. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London 55: 633-651.

 

Krefft (1865)

Krefft, Gerard. (1865). Zoological. The Sydney Morning Herald, Thursday, 20 April, p. 2.

 

Anonymous (1866)

Anonymous. (1866). Royal society. The Mercury, Saturday, 27 January, p. 3. [Walter L. Gellibrand donated thylacine]

 

Anonymous (1866)

Text:

TASMANIAN TIGER (Thylacinus cynocephalus).

At some remote period, when Tasmania was still part of the Australian mainland, this blood-thirsty animal existed not many hundred miles from Sydney, as has been proved by a number of teeth and bones found in the caves of Wellington Valley, which may be seen in the Australian Museum.

Its habitat, as far as we know, is now, however, restricted to the island of Tasmania, where it dwells among the rocks and impenetrable glens of the highest mountains, frequently attacking and carrying terror among the flocks of the settlers. The number of young produced is about four at a time.

 

Publication:

Anonymous. (1866). Australian natural history. Illustrated Sydney News, Monday, 16 April, p. 14.

 

Anonymous (1866)

Anonymous. (1866). Royal Society. The Mercury, Tuesday, 15 May, p. 3. [Walter L. Gellibrand donated head and hide of thylacine]

 

Anonymous (1866)

Anonymous. (1866). Proceedings of the Royal Society for May 1866. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1866: 37-38.

 

Krefft (1866a)

Krefft, Gerard. (1866). The Marsupial Lion of Australia–(Thylacoleo carnifex.). The Australasian, Saturday, 12 May, p. 5.

 

Krefft (1866b)

Krefft, Gerard. (1866). Professor M'Coy and the Rev. W. B. Clarke. The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday, 20 July, p. 2. [letter dated 18 July]

 

Krefft (1866c)

Krefft, Gerard. (1866). The Mammals of Australia. The Australasian, Saturday, 28 July, p. 5.

 

Krefft (1866d)

Krefft, Gerard. (1866). Professor M'Coy and the Marsupial Lion. The Australasian, Saturday, 25 August, p. 7. [letter date 15 August]

 

Krefft (1866e)

Krefft, Gerard. (1866). Mr. Krefft's report on the fossil remains found in the caves of Wellington Valley. The Sydney Morning Herald, Tuesday, 18 December, p. 5.

Krefft, Gerard. (1866). The fossil remains found in the caves of Wellington Valley. The Age, Saturday, 22 December, p. 7.

Krefft, Gerard. (1866). Mr. Krefft's report on the fossil remains found in the caves of Wellington Valley. Sydney Mail, Saturday, 22 December, p. 2.

Krefft, Gerard. (1866). Mr. Krefft's report on the fossil remains found in the caves of Wellington Valley. The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Saturday, 22 December, p. 3.

Krefft, Gerard. (1866). The fossil remains found in the caves of Wellington Valley. Leader, Saturday, 29 December, p. 9.

Anonymous. (1867). Fossil remains found in the caves of Wellington Valley. The Mercury, Thursday, 3 January, p. 3.

Anonymous. (1867). Fossil remains found in New South Wales. Launceston Examiner, Friday, 11 January, p. 3.

Krefft, Gerard. (1867). Mr. Krefft's report on the fossil remains found in the caves of Wellington Valley. Illustrated Sydney News, Tuesday, 16 July, p. 12.

 

Anonymous (1867)

Anonymous. (1867). Encounter with a Tasmanian tiger. Illustrated Sydney News, Tuesday, 16 April, p. 148, 149 [p. 4, 5?].

Anonymous. (1867). Encounter with a Tasmanian Tiger. Illustrated Adelaide Post, Saturday, 23 March, p. 36,38.

 

Anonymous (1867)

Anonymous. (1867). Town talk and table chat. The Cornwall Chronicle, Wednesday, 27 March, p. 4. [the only pre-1900 reference to blood sucking that I am currently aware of]

 

Anonymous (1867)

Anonymous. (1867). Dr. Schomburgk's visit to the other colonies. South Australian Register, Tuesday, 30 April, p. 2.

Anonymous. (1867). Dr. Schomburgk's visit to the other colonies. Adelaide Observer, Saturday, 4 May, p. 1. [two Tasmanian devils escaped]

 

Anonymous (1867)

Anonymous. (1867). The Australian Museum. The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday, 31 May, p. 4 |5|. [George Masters six month trip to Tasmania, brought back 4 thylacines]

Anonymous. (1867). The Australian Museum. Sydney Mail, Saturday, 1 June, p. 4.

Anonymous. (1867). The Australian Museum. The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Thursday, 6 June, p. 4. [George Masters six month trip to Tasmania, brought back 4 thylacines]

 

Anonymous (1867)

Anonymous. (1867). Native tiger. The Tasmanian Times, Thursday, 20 June, p. 2.

 

Anonymous (1867)

Anonymous. (1867). List of donations to the Australian Museum during November 1867. The Sydney Morning Herald, Wednesday, 11 December, p. 5.

Anonymous. (1867). List of donations to the Australian Museum during November 1867. Empire, Wednesday, 11 December, p. 4. [Mrs. James Cox]

  

Anonymous (1867)

Anonymous. (1867). Intercolonial Exhibition of Australasia, Melbourne, 1866-67: Official Record, containing Introduction, Catalogues, Reports and Awards of the Jurors, and Essays and Statistics on the Social and Economic Resources of the Australasian Colonies. Melbourne: Blundell & Co. [p. 57; 19th century thylacine photo of skeleton]

 

Anonymous (1867)

Text:

With regard to the bones, Mr. AUport mentioned that he had carefully examined the whole collection (kindly submitted to him, by Mr. Wintle), and found them to consist of various portions of the skeletons of BrushKangaroos and Vulpine Opossums. At the first glance Mr. Allport hadconcluded that some of the hones, from their size, belonged to Forester Kangaroos, hut from subsequent comparisons with the skull and bones of recent specimens he was now convinced that they all belonged to the Brush Kangaroo (Halmatitrus BennettiiJ, Without seeing the spot it wagof course impossible to judge of the geological age of these bones, but, from Mr. Wintle's description, Mr. Allport thought there could be little doubt that the cavern had, at some not very remote period, formed the residence of a native tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalm) . Many of the bones still contained some trace of animal matter, and all exhibited the appear- ance of having had the the flesh torn from them by beasts of prey—the skull and smaller bones being almost invariably broken," as though to clear out the brains, &c. That tigers were at one time to be found near HobartTown there is little doubt, as he (Mr. Allport) once saw one within three miles of the city—close to the present site of the reservoir, on the SandyBay Rivulet. Whatever the age of these bones might be great credit wasdue to Mr. Wintle for perseveringly unearthing them, and it was an example which he (Mr. Allport) would like to see more generally followed, as by such means interesting fossils would sooner or later be certainly brought to light.

 

Publication:

Anonymous. (1867). Proceedings of the Royal Society for June, 1867. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1867: 17-19.

 

Anonymous (1867)

Anonymous. (1867). Proceedings of the Royal Society for August, 1867. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1867: 22-23.

 

Anonymous (1867)

Text:

A communication from Mr. Denny, A.L.S., (Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society) was read, asking for parasites from our indigenous animals, especially from the Native Tiger, Devil, Bandicoot, Kangaroo and Wallaby, Platypus, Ecliidna, &c. ; also skeletons of any of the above.

 

Publication:

Anonymous. (1867). Proceedings of the Royal Society for November, 1867. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1867: 37-39.

 

Discussion:

The only request for parasites of the thylacine that I am currently aware of.

 

Baudement or Orbigny (1867?)

Baudement, G. (1867?). Dictionnaire universel d'histoire naturelle, vol. 13, p. 707.

or,

Orbigny, Charles Dessalines. (1867?). Thylacine, pp. 707. In: Dictionnaire universel d'histoire naturelle (Nouv. éd., rev., considérablement augm. et enrichie.). Volume 13 (Spic-Thwaitesia). Paris: A. Pilon et cie.

 

Flower (1867)

Flower, W. H. (1867). On the development and succession of the teeth in the Marsupialia. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. 157: 631-641.

 

Krefft (1867)

Krefft, Gerard. (1867). Australian marsupials. The Australasian, Saturday, 5 October, p. 7.

 

Allport (1868)

Allport, Morton. (1868). Remarks on Mr. Krefft’s “Notes on the Fauna of Tasmania”. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1868: 33-36.

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). Encounter with a Hyena. Launceston Examiner, Saturday, 14 March, p. 5.

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). The Sydney museum. Empire (Sydney), Saturday, 16 May, p. 5.

Anonymous. (1868). The Sydney museum. Empire (Sydney), Wednesday, 20 May, p. 6.

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). Royal society. The Mercury, Wednesday, 17 June, p. 2.

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). The animal kingdom in Tasmania. The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday, 19 June, p. 2.

Anonymous. (1868). The animal kingdom in Tasmania. Sydney Mail, Saturday, 20 June, p. 3.

Anonymous. (1868). The animal kingdom in Tasmania. The Mercury, Thursday, 2 July, p. 4.

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). Royal society. The Tasmanian Times, Wednesday, 15 July, p. 2.

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). The Australian Museum. Sydney Mail, Saturday, 10 October, p. 6.

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). Acclimatisation. The Argus, Saturday, 31 October, p. 6.

Anonymous. (1868). Acclimatisation. The Victorian society. The Australasian, Saturday, 7 November, p. 26.

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). The People's Auction. The Mercury, Friday, 11 December, p. 1.

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). Proceedings of the Royal Society for June, 1868. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1868: 25-26.

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). Proceedings of the Royal Society for July, 1868. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1868: 27-30. [p. 28]

 

Anonymous (1868)

Anonymous. (1868). List of objects presented to the museum during 1868. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1868: 80-81.

 

Krefft (1868a)

Krefft, Gerard. (1868). Description of a new species of thylacine (Thylacinus breviceps). Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist., (4), 2: 296-297.

 

Krefft (1868b)

Krefft, Gerard. (1868). Appendix 6, List of specimens collected by Mr George Masters, assistant curator, from December, 1866 to March 1867. In: Report of the Trustee’s for the year ending 31 of December, 1867, Australian Museum, pp. 9-10. Sydney, NSW: Thomas Richards, Government Printer.

 

Krefft (1868c)

Krefft, Gerard. (1868). Notes on the fauna of Tasmania. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1868: 90-105 [appendix].

 

Owen (1868)

Owen, Richard. (1868). On the Comparative Anatomy and Physiology of Vertebrates. Vol.3. Longmans Green: London. 915 pp.

 

Anonymous (1869)

Anonymous. (1869). The South. Daily Southern Cross, 5 July, 25(3732). [John Copland; New Zealand thylacine?]

Anonymous. (1869). [Untitled]. New Zealand Herald, 5 July, 6(1753). [John Copland; New Zealand thylacine?]

 

Anonymous (1869)

Anonymous. (1869). A trip to Waterhouse. The Cornwall Chronicle, Saturday, 2 October, p. 5.

 

Anonymous (1869)

Anonymous. (1869). Proceedings of the Royal Society for April, 1869. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1869: 5-6 .

 

Anonymous (1869)

Anonymous. (1869). List of objects presented to the museum during 1869, with names of donors. Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania 1869: 77-89.

 

Wintle (1869)

Wintle, S. H. (1869). The cave-bones from Glenorchy. The Mercury, Monday, 6 September, p. 3.

 

Still to add:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/28423012?searchTerm=Thylacinus

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k63682549/f11.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1330478;4

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6565358v/f259.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1351938;0

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6565358v/f277.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1351938;0

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6565358v/f266.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1351938;0

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k77342v/f118.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1373397;2

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k31231n/f774.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1416316;0

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k9692331z/f346.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1437775;2

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k699465/f67.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1459234;4

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k58204908/f1273.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1502153;2

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k39804b/f741.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1523612;4

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k39804b/f333.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1523612;4

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k9676465s/f247.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1545072;0

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k98006032/f194.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1566531;2

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k96729213/f644.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1223182;0

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6416941b/f550.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1244641;2

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k36933g/f346.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1266100;4

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k209734k/f17.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1287560;0

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k209734k/f11.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1287560;0

 

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k209734k/f28.image.r=thylacinus?rk=1287560;0